Friday, March 14, 2014

Antiquing at the Scott Antique Market in Atalnta


{Sets of French chairs fresh off a container from France at the Scott Antique Market}

Last week I finally had the chance to travel to Atlanta for the Scott Antique Market. My sister's birthday was last Monday, and we like to spend a long weekend together doing something fun! That something fun will always involve antiques. 

I grew up in a house full of collectors. I have many fond memories of going to the flea market with my Dad or trailing behind my Mom and Dad down the narrow aisles of an antique Warehouse in Cheraw, South Carolina on the way to the beach. We were bribed with candy!

A trip to the Scott Antique Market is almost as good as visiting the flea markets in Paris….

Well, maybe, not that good.

But for someone that doesn't get to go to France, Scott's is great! I LOVE the French chairs in the first photo! They were fresh off of a container from France bought as they traveled over the water only to be picked up at Scott's! They are headed to Marberger Farm at the Round Top Antique Market in Texas (April 1st) along with the gorgeous gray farm table below. 

{a beautiful old farm table with clean lines and its original gray paint}
This table was hard to photograph. The photo truly makes it look like just another gray table especially against the lovely linoleum floor. It is very long and has exquisite proportions and a beautiful, soft patina. The gray paint is the original finish. So many pieces at antique and flea markets have been stripped and repainted with gray chalk paint. It is so nice to see the difference!


Speaking of original paint…I took this photograph because I fell in love with these painted finishes.

Don't you love the colors!


No words really needed here….


My tastes have changed as I have grown older. I have a lot of dark, traditional, English furniture. I now crave a lighter palette and less serious vibe. I am slowly moving in that direction. That being said, I love a beautiful blonde, mahogany chest. This one had incredible color and a beautiful patina.

{My new dining room chairs in the rough}

The true reason I went to the Scott Market was to find some new chairs for my dining room. 

Two weeks before Thanksgiving, I sold my traditional dining room table and chairs and my English sideboard. My husband graciously indulged my ever-changing interior design cravings and off it went to a new home. Let's just say two weeks before Thanksgiving was not the best timing.

I went in search of a set of six Mutten leg chairs like the ones that Ina Garten has in her Hampton home (here). I actually found a couple of different sets but didn't like them as well as the ones pictured above. I was looking for a blonde finish on the legs but when you are looking at antiques you can't always get exactly what you envision. I bought these from a French man who said if I wanted to lighten the finish, spray the legs with ammonia and then wash them down with water until you get the desired color. That worries me just a little! Does anyone have any experience doing that? I plan to cover these in either old linen sheets or a light gray linen and run a contrasting tape along the lead edge.



{topiaries in all shapes and sizes at the Scott Antique Market}

We got to Scotts very early the first day and these topiaries were already selling quickly. They were incredibly healthy and so pretty they almost didn't look real. He had every kind you could imagine in different shapes and sizes and planted in charming pots and containers. 
Some of the terra-cotta pots were from France.

{an old gilded fragment mounted on lucite and made into a lamp}

Crusty, old gilded fragments are a hot antique item right now and these two lamps, above and below, made from old fragments were so chic! I have been saving my money for almost a year for this trip and had to really concentrate and buy only what I came for.


{Vintage African ceremonial blankets}

I have an affinity for old textiles and love the interesting colors and patterns of these African tribal blankets. The picture below shows a selection of African trade beads. 
Later in this post, you'll see the trade beads I came home with. 

{African trade beads rest a top an interesting pile of vintage African textiles}

{handmade paper dresses from Tom Delcambre}

I have taken pictures of the handmade paper dresses made by artist and antique dealer, Tom Delcambre before and shared them on the blog here. The attention to detail is absolutely unbelievable. He also makes the flowers below by hand and hand paints them. 

{handmade paper flowers from Tom Delcambre}


Scotts is full of not only beautiful old things but great new things like the nightstands in the pictures above and below. They are so chic and are custom made by Fabulous Things Ltd. I fell in love with the unique painted finish on the table above and the interesting shape of the table below. You can see just a peek of the faux bois finish of another nightstand on the left.



A friend at the market has been collecting and selling creamware for 25 years, and she was liquidating her collection. I wanted to buy everything in her booth! I have always had a weak spot for porcelains. I bought a beautiful set of floral creamware that I have not yet taken a picture of and I also bought the gray french potter's table that these watering cans and plates are sitting on. I don't have it yet at home because we couldn't fit everything we bought in our car. (Not a small problem)

Here are a few of the things that I feel in love with and actually came home with me.


I bought a set of 24 Herbariums. I plan to keep four or six of these and have them framed for one of the bedrooms in my mountain home. The others I plan to sell at our family's booth at the Antique and Design Center in High Point at the upcoming High Point Furniture Market.


The dealer I purchased these from said she purchased them many years ago and forgot about them. She recently found them again and brought them to the show. Lucky me!



{A vintage French poster I purchased at the Scott Antique Market}
Here's a vignette I put together in my side entry of some of the things I bought. 

I have been looking for a vintage French poster for the last several years and fell in love with the soft colors in this one. Bonus, it was already framed in a beautiful frame. My quest for a French poster started when French art posters were featured on One Kings Lane. Suzanne Kasler has a vintage Georges Braque poster that she bought at a flea market in France that hangs prominently over her bed (here). I have been looking for a Georges Braque poster (at a reasonable price) for years! Braque's work is closely associated with that of his colleague Pablo Picasso and often features abstract birds.

I have thought of a thousand different places where I would like to hang my new poster. Things move around in my house a lot so this is where it will live for now.

I am incredibly excited about my new myrtle topiaries. yes, they are real. It will be absolutely amazing if they are still alive this time next month! 


I also collect vintage flower frogs. These are my three favorites. Every time I go to the Scott Antique Market, I buy just one for my collection. There is a dealer at Scott's (Benton Hayden & Associates) that sells great garden antiques and always has a unique collection of flower frogs for sale. 

I bought the oval flower frog on the right at this market and its un-identical twin (the round one on the left) last year at Scott's. They are made from brass or copper wire and move up and down to adjust the height. I love both the color (patina) and sculptural form. They are both a patented design from 1935 by Ralph Beagle of California. 

The little round flower frog in the foreground is aptly named a "hairpin" frog.

I love walking around an antique market and talking to the dealers about the things they sell. You can learn a lot and have a little story to tell about the things that you buy.

{My collection of vintage flower frogs}

I bought a strand of African trade beads in a frosty beachglass-blue-green. I was told that the beads were handmade in the mid 1900's from old Coke bottles. The beads are heavy and irregular and are strung on raffia. I love the way they give a little movement and soft color to a still life display.


{African trade beads from the mid 1900's made from old Coke bottles}

{My guest bedroom with the pair of Wedgewood drabware pitchers I purchased at Scott's}
I really tried to resist buying a lot of small things that were not on my list of wants and needs but I couldn't resist this sweet little pair of drabware pitchers. Martha Stewart created a paint color, "drabware" for her collection. I filled the pitchers with the first flowers to come up in my garden this Spring - Lenten Rose or Hellabores. I am embarrassed to tell you how little I paid for these two little beauties. I have never seen so many beautiful old things at incredibly reasonable prices.


{Hellabores from my garden in a pair of Drabware pitchers I purchased at Scott's}


Are you a collector?




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4 comments:

  1. oh. I enjoyed every bit of this post. I was going to scott's on friday, but it was so rainy and cold here, I couldn't bear to make the 3 hour drive. I am going to try to go in april.

    thanks for the look, allison. donna

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  2. Great finds... I want to visit Scott's sometime, a little drive from SoCal! i enjoyed your tour Thank you for sharing.
    A beautiful weekend to you,
    Gail

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  3. I am coveting several things in your photos. I would get in a lot of trouble at Scott's - hope to visit soon! ;-)

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  4. I've never heard of using amonia to lighten wood, but I've heard of wood bleach, which seems to be mainly oxalic acid. I have used household bleach before, but understand it's not good for the grain, so next time I'm going to try using the wood bleach.

    ReplyDelete